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Wednesday, 19 October 2011

Season Upon Season with Thanksgiving/MANN

What is it about fall that causes melancholy? The colours of rust and gold weave through the almost forgotten garden and remind us that it’s not over, until it’s over. With each new wind and each chilling first, the trees give up their glorious colours: reds and yellows slowly fall to the ground forming a luscious mat of fallen leaves.

Perhaps it’s in the submitting to the season that brings feelings of sadness and yet we know summer can’t go on for ever. Cousins in Cumberland Cty, N.S. tell me they’ve already had snow. I’m sure that those among us who anxiously await the winter months hope winter will be early and run its course to late spring, so they will have lots of the white stuff to enjoy in a variety of activities.

In our day to day life, the letting go of one important season of our life and grasping the new reminds me a little of swinging on a trapeze. Those of us who have watched this realize that the one on the swing has to let go and trust that the new swing in front of them will hold, thrill and support them across the open space.

I often use the concept of season. Being on the farm was one season of my life. Getting into a size 12 was another. Having babies, raising teenagers, holding grandchildren and now awaiting a great grandchild is a new and anticipated season for me. Probably the most current season is possible changes to our beloved writer’s group, The Word Writers. Is it soon to be a season in my life . . . upon which to reflect in the past? This too teaches that a change in one season can be a domino effect to bring on another season: leaving the farm affects the momentum of the writing group.

When I look at the picture of the golden leafed tree, I see a perfect fall scene — yet a hint of what is to come. Later in the day, after a cool October wind blows across our lawn, I see the top half of a barren tree and its leaves resting below on the lawn. The leaves still look in their glory, but they're in a different place, seemingly looking up from whence they came. But, we know it’s not over for them, yet.

Is there a truth for each one of us in this season, or the one to come?

Blessings,
Donna Mann
http://www.donnamann.org/
Agnes Macphail juvenile reading series is available from Brucedale Press or from my website.
“Come to the Farm” children’s stories at www.donnamann.org/meadowlaneBooks.html

1 comment:

Peter Black said...

Thanks Donna, for your winsome autumn/fall musings.
I like your "The [fallen] leaves still look in their glory, but they're in a different place, seemingly looking up from whence they came. But, we know it’s not over for them, yet."